The Life of Horatio Lord Nelson was the third book of 2016, which I enjoyed.

If you’ve read or heard anything about Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson you know his most famous quote, “England expects that every man will do his duty!”  Personally, I have been extremely intrigued by what the world would consider history’s greatest Admiral.  This was a very quick read and opened my eyes to the life behind the man.

The Life of Horatio Lord Nelson

 

You Are Not So Smart was the second book of 2016, which I enjoyed.

You Are Not So Smart seeks to demonstrate that each of us, humans, attempts to make rational and detached decisions.  However, it further explains why these rational and detached decisions, aren’t actually that, in most cases.  The author continues to explain the intricacies of each area of things that humans believe then explains how the contrary is true.The most interesting things I found in this book were Learned Helplessness, in which the author explains why, as an example, people are less likely to assist other people if they are in a group as compared to if they are the only individual able to render assistance;

The most interesting things I found in You Are Not So Smart was Learned Helplessness, in which the author explains why, as an example, people are less likely to assist other people if they are in a group as compared to if they are the only individual able to render assistance.  Unfortunately, I have had numerous real world experiences that are consistent with this phenomenon.  Another great item discussed is the Illusion of Transparency… you’ll need to enjoy You Are Not So Smart for yourself to get this nugget!

You Are Not So Smart

 

Next: The Future Just Happened was the first book of 2016, which I enjoyed.

Next: The Future Just Happened is an interesting book which uses several specific historical examples of outliers upsetting the balance of functions, large processes, or organizations.  The most interesting to me was in the midst of the early years of the internet’s commercialization, Jonathan G. Lebed, then a 14-year-old, starts encouraging individuals to make certain stock trades through his pseudo developed persona which day traders began to trust because of his quick responses and succinct answers to trading questions.   This ultimately led to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) prosecuting him.

The interesting part of Next: The Future Just Happened is that Jonathan Lebed was not doing anything that any stock broker would do.  he was just using the internet to build his portfolio of people willing to listen and accept his advice, free and unverified, on the internet.  The other interesting portion of this story was Lebed’s parents understanding of what the internet was and the SEC’s expectation of the level of understanding of the parents understanding of the stock market and the internet.

If you enjoy understanding how the balance of things can be upset, Next: The Future Just Happened is a book with several very well done critical examples in recent history.

Next: The Future Just Happened

 
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