Currently viewing the category: "Strategy"

Download (PDF, 5.61MB)

Navy FY2016 Budget Highlights Book

Below is my personal quick summary of the Navy FY2016 Budget Highlights Book as it most pertains to those individuals in the Information Dominance Corps.

Strategic Guidance:

Protect the Homeland

  • Maintain a safe, secure, and effective nuclear deterrent
  • Fight terrorism through counter-terrorism/irregular warfare operations
  • Defend the homeland and provide support to civil authorities
  • Counter weapons of mass destruction

Build Security Globally

  • Provide a stabilizing presence across the globe
  • Conduct stability and counterinsurgency operations
  • Conduct humanitarian, disaster relief, and other operations

Project Power and Win Decisively

  • Defer and defeat aggression
  • Project power despite anti-access/area denial challenges
  • Operate effectively in space and cyberspace

Four key factors:

People

Platforms

Power

Partnerships


Cyber Resiliency:

To operate effectively in every mission, we invest in protection of our cyber networks. The Department has expanded previous investments in Operation Rolling Tide (ORT), which was primarily focused on tactical networks such as NGEN and CANES, to include combat and other control systems on tactical platforms. Task Force Cyber Awakening (TFCA) was established to provide a holistic view of cyber security across the Navy enterprise. Based on TFCA’s prioritizations of required capabilities to improve Navy’s cyber posture, the DoN added $300 million across the FYDP across a broad spectrum of programs. Together, ORT and TFCA efforts form the Cyber Resiliency Plan; investments made in this budget will lead to significant improvements in the DoN’s Cyber posture.

Bottom Line:

The Fiscal Year 2016 (FY16) baseline budget submission of $161.0 billion for the Department of the Navy (DoN) is an increase of $1.5 billion (1%) from the FY16 value presented in last year’s budget. In a challenging fiscal environment, the DoN FY16 budget supports the priorities of the President’s Defense Strategic Guidance (DSG), as amplified by the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), and the priorities of the Secretary of the Navy, Chief of Naval Operations and Commandant of the Marine Corps. The DoN can meet the mission areas outlined the DSG and QDR, but with risk. The Department prioritized investments to provide a credible, modern and safe strategic deterrent; global forward presence of combat ready forces; preserve the means to defeat one aggressor and simultaneously deny the objectives of a second; focus on critical afloat and ashore readiness and personnel; sustain asymmetrical advantages; and sustain a relevant industrial base.

The FY16 request for overseas contingency operations (OCO) continues to fund the incremental costs to sustain ongoing operational commitments, equipment/infrastructure repair, manpower, as well as equipment replacement. The FY16 DoN OCO request is $7.0 billion.

Highlights:

  • The budget request reflects a deployable battle forces of 282 ships in FY16, including 11 aircraft carriers, 31 amphibious ships, 87 large surface combatants, 22 small surface combatants, 4 guided missile submarines and 53 nuclear powered attack submarines. This battle force number reflects Congressional NDAA language on ship counting rules.
    • Fourteen battle force ships will be delivered in FY16: 1 Nuclear Aircraft Carrier (CVN), 2 Nuclear Attack Submarines (SSN), 5 Littoral Combat Ships (LCS), 2 Joint High Speed Vessels (JHSV), 1 Amphibious Transport Dock (LPD), 2 Destroyers (DDG) and 1 Zumwalt-class Destroyer (DDG 1000).
    • Three Nuclear Attack Submarines (SSN) will be retired.
  • Ship procurement funds 9 new-construction ships in FY16 (2 SSNs, 2 DDG 51, 3 LCS, 1 LPD, and 1 T-AO(X)) and 48 ships across the Future Years Defense Plan (FYDP).
  • Aircraft procurement funds 124 airframes in FY16 and 492 airframes across the FYDP.
    • Major aviation procurement in FY16 includes: 13 F-35B/C, 5 E-2D, 16 P-8A, 2 KC-130J, 28 AH-1Z/UH-1Y, 19 MV-22, 29 MH-60R, and 12 UAV.
  • Military basic pay and civilian pay are increased by 1.3 percent.
  • This budget continues implementation of a streamlined reduction to Major Headquarters operating budgets, as well as continued initiatives begun with the FY15 budget to reduce acquisition costs.

[Department of Navy Budget Materials]

Incoming search terms:

nifc-ca collateral, sm-6 missile, fy2016 dod presidents budget submission], Navy cyber ORT/TFCA
 

Download (PDF, 391KB)

2015 National Security StrategyFirst and foremost, we will lead with purpose. American leadership is a global force for good, but it is grounded in our enduring national interests as outlined in the 2010 National Security Strategy:

  • The security of the United States, its citizens, and U.S. allies and partners;
  • A strong, innovative, and growing U.S. economy in an open international economic system that promotes opportunity and prosperity;
  • Respect for universal values at home and around the world; and
  • A rules-based international order advanced by U.S. leadership that promotes peace, security, and opportunity through stronger cooperation to meet global challenges.

Policy tradeoffs and hard choices will need to be made. In such instances, we will prioritize efforts that address the top strategic risks to our interests:

  • Catastrophic attack on the U.S. homeland or critical infrastructure;
  • Threats or attacks against U.S. citizens abroad and our allies;
  • Global economic crisis or widespread economic slowdown;
  • Proliferation and/or use of weapons of mass destruction;
  • Severe global infectious disease outbreaks;
  • Climate change;
  • Major energy market disruptions; and
  • Significant security consequences associated with weak or failing states (including mass atrocities, regional spillover, and transnational organized crime).

[Whitehouse.gov]

 

Download (PDF, 217KB)

We’ve reviewed Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert testimony to the House Armed Services Committee.  Admiral Greenert has posted his 2014 CNO Navigation Plan for Fiscal Years (FY) 2015-2019.  Key items in the Information Dominance Corps realm within his Sailing Directions are:

WARFIGHTING FIRST –

  • Enhance our ability to maneuver freely in the electromagnetic spectrum by equipping our ships with more capability to intercept signals and conduct information warfare, and by adding jamming and deception capabilities to counter advanced anti-ship missiles. The budget request also supports the Next Generation Jammer, providing the EA-18G GROWLER with enhanced Airborne Electronic Attack capabilities starting in 2021.
  • Strengthen our cyber posture by developing systems to deter, detect, and mitigate insider threats and safeguard classified national security information. We will also align Navy networks with a more defensible DOD Joint Information Environment through installations of Consolidated Afloat Networks and Enterprise Services (CANES) on combatants and at Maritime Operation Centers; implement the Next Generation Enterprise Network (NGEN) ashore; and consolidate data centers. In addition, we are establishing a single Navy “CYBERSAFE” authority to manage cyber security of Navy-wide networks, platforms, BE READY America’s Navy is at its best when operating forward. Our overseas presence gives the President options, and bolsters global stability through frequent engagement with allies and partners, building trust and confidence.

OPERATE FORWARD – While no individual bullet point sites a specific task for the Information Dominance Corps (IDC) the major move to push more ships & forces forward, increase their Operational Tempo, and rotate crews at the edge are major changes.  Thus the IDC importance is built within every bullet point listed.  These changes make the Network and Communication mission sets of the IDC more significant.  It also challenges network availability & integrity while stressing satellite and terrestrial communication pathways with higher traffic loads and most likely a more congested spectrum loading.

BE READY –

  • Continues to evolve Information Dominance as a mainstream warfighting discipline by establishing a dedicated Type Commander – the Navy Information Dominance Forces Command – responsible for the readiness of intelligence, oceanography and meteorology, information warfare, networks, and space capabilities.

[via Navy.mil]

Make sure to review the CNO’s 2012 update in his 2012 CNO’s Postion Report and the 2013 CNO Navigation Plan!

Incoming search terms:

cno navigation plan 2015 - 2019, CNOs Navigation Plan 2015 - 2019
 
Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.